After the front garden, the delightful capitals on the front-porch columns are among the first features to catch the eye on the approach to this 1909 home. Like many original aspects of the house, they required special care during a recent renovation that necessitated updates throughout the house. A massive, sustained electrical-power surge truly fried several houses on this block. The family moved out for nearly a year while walls, ceilings, and floors were peeled open for re-wiring. The kitchen was one beneficiary of this misfortune; a wall of shiplap was left exposed and period-appropriate soapstone countertops are now complemented by new, retro-style appliances.

A large bathroom adjacent to the kitchen was down-sized and an extension built to serve as a butler’s pantry and a laundry room (with two washers and two dryers – a practical necessity for this family of several teenagers). Another rear addition was renovated to serve as the master suite, complete with vaulted ceiling, a stylish bathroom, a walk-in closet, and a view into the deep backyard. A gracious deck spans the width of the house and is decorated with a variety of succulents. Beyond the pool, an aged wisteria blankets a wide chicken run. The current owners were disappointed when, during renovations, they popped off the bottom newel of the stair railing; they had heard it was common practice for builders to store original plans there. The unstained, quarter-sawn oak floors downstairs are all original to the house, as are the pocket doors and a number of other tasteful details. Also original are many pieces of art hanging throughout the house, including several by art-student members of the household.

After the front garden, the delightful capitals on the front-porch columns are among the first features to catch the eye on the approach to this 1909 home. Like many original aspects of the house, they required special care during a recent renovation that necessitated updates throughout the house. A massive, sustained electrical-power surge truly fried several houses on this block. The family moved out for nearly a year while walls, ceilings, and floors were peeled open for re-wiring. The kitchen was one beneficiary of this misfortune; a wall of shiplap was left exposed and period-appropriate soapstone countertops are now complemented by new, retro-style appliances.

A large bathroom adjacent to the kitchen was down-sized and an extension built to serve as a butler’s pantry and a laundry room (with two washers and two dryers – a practical necessity for this family of several teenagers). Another rear addition was renovated to serve as the master suite, complete with vaulted ceiling, a stylish bathroom, a walk-in closet, and a view into the deep backyard. A gracious deck spans the width of the house and is decorated with a variety of succulents. Beyond the pool, an aged wisteria blankets a wide chicken run.

The current owners were disappointed when, during renovations, they popped off the bottom newel of the stair railing; they had heard it was common practice for builders to store original plans there. The unstained, quarter-sawn oak floors downstairs are all original to the house, as are the pocket doors and a number of other tasteful details. Also original are many pieces of art hanging throughout the house, including several by art-student members of the household.